2018 Federal Poverty Level

Income Bracket Chart

The 2018 Open Enrollment Period starts November 1st, 2017 and ends December 15th, 2017. Check out where you fall on the Federal Poverty Level to determine if you may be eligible for a subsidy. For Alaska or Hawaii, click here.

The Federal Poverty Level (“FPL”) is used to determine two important things. Under the Affordable Care Act, if a household falls between 100% and 400% of the FPL, they may be eligible for subsidies to help them pay their monthly premiums. To determine if you are eligible for subsidies for the 2018 calendar year, you would look at the rates on this 2018 FPL chart.  If your income falls around 250% of the Federal Poverty Level and you enroll in a Silver Plan, you may be eligible for an additional Cost Savings Reductions to pay your out-of-pocket costs.

FPL is also used to determine whether a person or family is eligible Medicaid or CHIP. The income cutoff for these state-run programs varies per state depending on whether a state expanded the eligibility requirements under the ACA.

You can use the chart or click below to get rates and subsidy information for your area.

See what you qualify for ›

Questions about the 2018 FPL Brackets?

Contact us toll-free: 1-844-477-4646

Persons in Household FPL100% FPL138%* Save on Health Insurance
FPL250%Apply Now
FPL400%Apply Now
9+ If your household is larger than 8 people, add $4,180 for each additional person.
1 $12,060 $16,642 $30,150 $48,240
2 $16,240 $22,411 $40,600 $64,960
3 $20,420 $28,179 $51,050 $81,680
4 $24,600 $33,948 $61,500 $98,400
5 $28,780 $39,716 $71,950 $115,120
6 $32,960 $45,484 $82,400 $131,840
7 $37,140 $51,253 $92,850 $148,560
8 $41,320 $57,021 $103,300 $165,280
Possibly Medicaid EligibleContact Your State › Save on Health InsuranceApply Now ›
*The ACA law text says that Medicaid expansion shall be to 133% of the FPL, but requires a new method of calculating that income level whereby the state actually includes everyone under 138% of the FPL and just disregards the 5% difference.

Updated 2018 Income Brackets to Determine Subsidy Eligibility

Under the ACA, there are 19 states that chose to expand the eligibility requirements of the Medicaid program. If you live in one of these states, you may be eligible for health insurance coverage under your state’s Medicaid program if you earn under 138% of the Federal Poverty Level. If you do not live in a state that expanded Medicaid, you may be eligible if you earn less than 100% of the Federal Poverty Level.

If you have questions about where you fall within the 2018 Federal Poverty Level Chart,
feel free to contact us at: 1-844-477-4646

Alaska2018 Federal Poverty Level

Income Bracket Chart

Persons in Household FPL100%
FPL138%*
FPL250%
FPL400%
Save on Health Insurance ›
If your household contains more than 8 people, add $5,230 for each additional person.
1 $15,060 $20,782 $37,650 $60,240
2 $20,290 $28,000 $50,725 $81,160
3 $25,520 $35,217 $63,800 $102,080
4 $30,750 $42,435 $76,875 $123,000
5 $35,980 $49,652 $89,950 $143,920
6 $41,210 $56,869 $103,025 $164,840
7 $46,440 $64,087 $116,100 $185,760
8 $51,670 $71,304 $129,175 $206,680
Get affordable coverage in:Alaska Check Rates ›
*The ACA law text says 133% of the FPL, but asks states to calculate using 138% of the FPL and disregard the 5% difference.

Hawaii2018 Federal Poverty Level

Income Bracket Chart

Persons in Household FPL100%
FPL138%*
FPL250%
FPL400%
Save on Health Insurance ›
If your household contains more than 8 people, add $4,810 for each additional person.
1 $13,860 $19,126 $34,650 $55,440
2 $18,670 $25,764 $46,675 $74,680
3 $23,480 $32,402 $58,700 $93,920
4 $28,290 $39,040 $70,725 $113,160
5 $33,100 $45,678 $82,750 $132,400
6 $37,910 $52,315 $94,775 $151,640
7 $42,720 $58,953 $106,800 $170,880
8 $47,530 $65,591 $118,825 $190,120
Get affordable coverage in:Hawaii Check Rates ›
*The Affordable Care Act text says 133% of the Federal Poverty Level, but asks states to calculate using 138% of the FPL and disregard the 5% difference.

2018 Premium Tax Credits or Subsidies

Premium tax credits, also known as subsidies, are discounts applied to the premium amount that you would owe the insurance carrier every month. To determine how much of a subsidy you may be eligible for every month, you would determine where you fall on the Federal Poverty Level charts above. At the end of the calendar year, you will have to file a special tax form – Form 8962 – to verify your income and the premiums that you paid per month after the subsidy or premium tax credit was taken out.

Have questions about what health insurance will cost for the 2018 enrollment season? Open Enrollment starts on November 1, 2017, and ends on December 15, 2017.
Connect with a licensed agent: 1-844-477-4646

 

Cost Sharing Reductions

Income Based

Another way you can reduce the cost of health coverage under Obamacare/ACA is by qualifying for Cost-Sharing Reductions. If you earn up to 250% of the Federal Poverty Level and enroll in a silver plan on the health insurance marketplace, you may be eligible for an extra savings called Cost Sharing Reduction (CSR). This money can be used to reimburse yourself for health insurance-related out-of-pocket expenses, like deductibles, copays and co-insurance costs. Another benefit of qualifying for Cost-Sharing Reductions, which is also called “extra savings” is that your out-of-pocket costs will be capped at a lower amount than other on-exchange health plans, which means that once you meet that threshold, your insurance policy will pay for all of your medical bills.

To determine whether you earn 250% of the Federal Poverty Level, you can review the charts above for the 48 contiguous states and the charts for Alaska and Hawaii, which have separate income requirements. Once you know where your household income falls on the Federal Poverty Level for your state, you should look at the 2018 Health Insurance Cost Assistance chart below to determine whether you’re eligible for any premium tax credits (or subsidies) or Cost-Sharing Reductions (or extra savings).

See what you qualify for ›

Questions about the 2018 FPL Brackets?

Contact us toll-free: 1-844-477-4646

% Federal Poverty Level Income Bracket

$ Money for Premiums, Copays, & Deductibles

2018 Health Insurance Cost Assistance
FPL % .Covered Costs .Your Costs
equal to or less than 135%
100%
0%
between 135% and 140%
75%
25%
between 140% and 145%
50%
50%
between 145% and 150%
25%
75%
151% or more
0%
100%

 

FPL Income 100-250%

If you earn between 100% and 250% of the Federal Poverty Level and you end up enrolling in a Silver Plan on the health insurance marketplace, you may qualify for additional tax credits called the Cost Savings Reductions (CSR), which are issued when you file your federal income taxes and can be used to reimburse a household for the out-of-pocket expenses they incurred during the year. Individuals and families that are eligible for Cost Savings Reductions will also be eligible for lower out-of-pocket expense caps, which means that the amount of money that they will have to pay out-of-pocket throughout the year for their health insurance needs like deductibles, copays and co-insurance will be less than other plans.

FPL Income >138%

If you earn less than 138% of Federal Poverty Level and you live in one of the 19 states that expanded Medicaid eligibility requirements under the ACA, you may be eligible for health insurance coverage under your state’s Medicaid program. Unfortunately, people who are eligible for Medicaid are not also eligible for subsidies to buy health insurance on the marketplace.

If you live in a state that did not expand Medicaid then you may be able to enroll in health insurance through your state’s Medicaid program if you earn less than 100% of the Federal Poverty Level. There are some states that have any even lower income requirement, meaning that you must fall somewhere below 100% of the FPL in order to get Medicaid coverage. Because of this, some people find themselves in a situation where they earn more than is required in order to get Medicaid in their state, but less than is required to get subsidies under Obamacare, which starts at 100% FPL. In this instance, a person must pay full price for their health insurance premiums. For people who fall in this Medicaid gap, another type of healthcare coverage like a short-term medical plan may be a better and more affordable option.

FPL Income 100-133%

Prior to the Affordable Care Act (ACA), only families with children and pregnant women were eligible for Medicaid coverage through their state. The ACA not only allowed states to expand the income requirements so that people who earned more could get coverage through Medicaid, but it also allowed states to expand eligibility to low-income individual adults as well. If a state opted to expand Medicaid (and currently 19 states have opted to do so) the ACA law says that anyone earning less than 133% of the Federal Poverty Level would be able to get coverage through Medicaid. The ACA law also directed states to actually calculate the income requirements up to 138% of the FPL and simply disregard the 5% differential. If a family is not eligible for Medicaid due to their income level, they may be able to get coverage for their children through CHIP, which is another state-run healthcare program. CHIP has higher income requirements for coverage than Medicaid, so oftentimes, even though a family is not eligible for coverage under their state’s Medicaid program because they make too much money, their children can get coverage through CHIP.

Looking for last year’s income brackets?

View 2017 FPL Charts ›