2022 Federal Poverty Level

View The 2022 FPL Rate Table – Text Version

Family Size FPL 100% FPL 138% FPL 250% FPL 400%
1 $12,888 $17,774 $32,200 $51,520
2 $17,420 $24,039 $43,550 $69,680
3 $21,960 $30,304 $54,900 $87,840
4 $26,500 $36,570 $66,250 $106,000
5 $31,040 $42,835 $77,600 $124,160
6 $35,580 $49,100 $88,950 $142,320
7 $40,120 $55,365 $100,300 $160,480
8 $44,660 $61,630 $111,650 $178,640

Alaska 2022 Federal Poverty Level

Family Size FPL 100% FPL 138% FPL 250% FPL 400%
1 $16,090 $22,204 $40,225 $64,360
2 $21,770 $30,042 $54,425 $87,080
3 $27,450 $37,881 $68,625 $109,800
4 $33,130 $45,719 $82,825 $132,520
5 $38,810 $53,557 $97,025 $155,240
6 $44,490 $61,396 $111,225 $177,960
7 $50,170 $69,234 $125,425 $200,680
8 $55,850 $77,073 $139,625 $223,400

Hawaii 2022 Federal Poverty Level

Family Size FPL 100% FPL 138% FPL 250% FPL 400%
1 $14,820 $20,451 $37,050 $59,280
2 $20,040 $27,655 $50,100 $80,160
3 $25,260 $34,858 $63,150 $101,040
4 $30,480 $42,062 $76,200 $121,920
5 $35,700 $49,266 $89,250 $142,800
6 $40,920 $56,469 $102.300 $163,680
7 $46,140 $63,673 $115,350 $184,560
8 $51,360 $70,876 $128,400 $205,440

The next Open Enrollment Period starts November 1, 2022 for health insurance plans that will start on January 1, 2022. In the meantime, you may be able to enroll in coverage through a special enrollment period. Check where you fall on the Federal Poverty Level to determine how much of a subsidy you may be eligible for. For Alaska or Hawaii, click here.

The Federal Poverty Level (“FPL”) is used for a couple of important things: 1) whether you’re eligible for a subsidy; and 2) whether you’re eligible for a Cost Savings Reduction tax credit. 

Under the Affordable Care Act, people with a household income of 100% to 400% of the FPL qualify for tax credits, a.k.a. subsidies, to help lower the cost of monthly health insurance premiums. To determine if you’re eligible for subsidies, take a look at the rates on this FPL chart.

For the purposes of subsidies, the federal government actually uses poverty levels from the year before your coverage effective year. So if you’re enrolling in 2022 coverage, the government bases your subsidy amount on 2021 FPL rates. These are the rates featured in our chart. Use these rates to determine where you fall in the income charts for 2022.

Also, if your income falls at or below 250% of the Federal Poverty Level and you enroll in a Silver Plan, you may be eligible for additional Cost Savings Reductions to pay your out-of-pocket costs.

FPL is also used to determine whether you and/or your children are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP. The income cutoff for these joint federal- and state-run programs varies per state depending on whether a state expanded the eligibility requirements under the ACA. Note that eligibility for Medicaid and CHIP are based on current year FPL rates, not a year behind like the subsidies. For 2022 FPL charts, visit this federal website.

New for 2022

As of 2021, Congress expanded access to subsidies for people earning above 400% of the federal poverty limit under the American Rescue Plan Act (ARPA). The ARPA also made subsidies more substantial for lower income families. 

People with income above 400% of the FPL have a cap of 8.5% for health insurance premium contributions, meaning they won’t have to contribute more than 8.5% of their income towards premiums on the marketplace. 

Households with income below the original 400% cap benefit, too. For example, for people with incomes of up to 150% of the FPL, the silver benchmark plan on the marketplace may now have a $0 premium and extra low cost sharing (like deductibles and copays) thanks to expanded subsidies.

This expansion is not permanent, but it is in effect through at least 2022.

You can use the chart or click below to get rates and subsidy information for your area.

See what you qualify for ›

Questions about the 2022 FPL Brackets?

Contact us toll-free: 1-844-477-4646

Persons in Household FPL100% FPL138%* Save on Health Insurance
FPL250%Apply Now
FPL400%Apply Now
9+ If your household is larger than 8 people, add $4,540 for each additional person.
1 $12,880 $17,774 $32,200 $51,520
2 $17,420 $24,039 $43,550 $69,680
3 $21,960 $30,304 $54,900 $87,840
4 $26,500 $36,570 $66,250 $106,000
5 $31,040 $42,835 $77,600 $124,160
6 $35,580 $49,100 $88,950 $142,320
7 $40,120 $55,365 $100,300 $160,480
8 $44,660 $61,630 $111,650 $178,640
Possibly Medicaid EligibleContact Your State › Save on Health InsuranceApply Now ›
*The ACA law text says that Medicaid expansion shall be to 133% of the FPL, but requires a new method of calculating that income level whereby the state actually includes everyone under 138% of the FPL and just disregards the 5% difference.

2022 Premium Tax Credits or Subsidies

Premium tax credits, also known as subsidies, are discounts applied to the premium amount that you would owe the insurance carrier every month. Look at where your income falls in relation to your household size in the charts above to determine where you fall on the Federal Poverty Level chart. Individuals and families with incomes that fall between 100% and 400% on the chart may be eligible for cost savings in the form of tax credits (subsidies). 

At the end of the calendar year, you will have to file Form 8962 with the IRS to verify your income and the premiums that you paid per month after the subsidy or premium tax credit was taken out.

Have questions about what health insurance will cost for the 2022 enrollment season? Open Enrollment will start on November 1, 2022. Coverage will start January 1, 2023.


Connect with a licensed agent: 1-844-477-4646

Cost Sharing Reductions

Income Based

If you earn up to 250% of the Federal Poverty Level and you choose a silver plan through the federal marketplace, you may be eligible for tax credits called Cost-Sharing Reductions, which lower what you pay out of pocket for medical care, including things like your annual deductible and copays.

These extra Cost-Sharing Reductions effectively make silver plans similar to platinum plans without the platinum price tag, meaning you get significantly more bang for your medical buck.

To determine whether you earn 250% of the Federal Poverty Level, you can review the charts above for the 48 contiguous states and the charts for Alaska and Hawaii, which have separate income requirements. 

Once you know where your household income falls on the Federal Poverty Level for your state, look at the 2022 Health Insurance Cost Assistance chart below to determine whether you’re eligible for any premium tax credits (or subsidies) or Cost-Sharing Reductions (or extra savings).

See what you qualify for ›

Questions about the 2022 FPL Brackets?

Contact us toll-free: 1-844-477-4646

% Federal Poverty Level Income Bracket

$ Money for Premiums, Copays, & Deductibles

2022 Health Insurance Cost Assistance
FPL % Covered Costs Your Costs
equal to or less than 135%
100%
0%
between 135% and 140%
75%
25%
between 140% and 145%
50%
50%
between 145% and 150%
25%
75%
151% or more
0%
100%

FPL Income 100-250%

If you earn between 100% and 250% of the Federal Poverty Level and enroll in a Silver Plan on the health insurance marketplace, you may qualify for additional tax credits known as Cost Savings Reductions (CSR), which lower what you pay out of pocket to get medical care.

Cost-sharing reductions are automatically applied to the cost sharing amounts on the silver plan you choose. So if, for example, the plan had a $5,000 deductible without these reductions, that plan could have a $3,500 deductible for you instead. Or you might have a $10 copay to see a doctor instead of $20. (These are just examples; actual cost sharing amounts and reductions vary.) CSRs can significantly reduce your medical costs, on top of the tax credits you get for the premiums. So if your income falls between 100% and 250% of the FPL, consider a silver plan to maximize your cost savings.

FPL Income >138%

If you earn less than 138% of Federal Poverty Level and you live in one of the 39 states (including D.C.) that expanded Medicaid eligibility requirements under the ACA, you may be eligible for health insurance coverage under your state’s Medicaid program. Unfortunately, people who are eligible for Medicaid are not also eligible for subsidies to buy health insurance on the marketplace.

If you live in a state that did not expand Medicaid, then you may be able to enroll in health insurance through your state’s Medicaid program if you earn less than 100% of the Federal Poverty Level. These states typically have tight restrictions on who can apply for this assistance in the first place.

But some states have even tighter income requirements and/or stricter requirements on who can get Medicaid coverage. Because of this, some people find themselves in a situation where they earn too much for Medicaid but too little to get subsidies under Obamacare, which starts at 100% FPL. In this instance, a person must pay full price for their health insurance premiums. For people who fall in this Medicaid gap, another type of healthcare coverage like a short-term medical plan may be a more affordable, temporary solution.

FPL Income 100-133%

Prior to the [hnd word=”Affordable Care Act”] (ACA), Medicaid was usually only available to families with children, pregnant women and some people with disabilities in many states. The ACA not only allowed states to expand the income requirements so that people who earned more could get coverage through Medicaid, but it also allowed states to expand eligibility to low-income individual adults without any qualifiers as well. 

If a state opted to expand Medicaid (and currently 38 states plus D.C. have opted to do so) the ACA says that anyone earning less than 133% of the Federal Poverty Level would be able to get coverage through Medicaid. The ACA law also directed states to actually calculate the income requirements up to 138% of the FPL and simply disregard the 5% difference. 

Keep in mind, too, that even if you aren’t eligible for Medicaid due to your income level, you may be able to get coverage for your child(ren) through the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which is another state-run healthcare program. CHIP has higher income requirements for coverage than Medicaid, so oftentimes, even though a family is not eligible for coverage under their state’s Medicaid program because they make too much money, their children can get coverage through CHIP.

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